Stenography

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werner
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Stenography

Post by werner » February 22nd, 2010, 1:38 pm

Thema: Stenography
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Autor: noGromo

Good Morning Plenary,

Is there anyone among us with the apparently extinct talent of writing in shorthand? I myself don't belong to the species yet, but I'm learning it and it is a lot of fun to me. And as a positive side-effect, stenography is very practical for daily use.
Now to my question: Which fountain pens are best suitable for writing shorthand? The nib has to be flexible, that is for sure. But is that all? Right now I am using a Pelikano fountain pen for shorthand with what I would call a semi-flexible nib. At least is seems to contain a lot of pressure or it would bend, wouldn't it? Would flexible nibs of older pens withstand the pressure, too, or would they bend? What do you use? Which fountain pens can you recommend?

Pre-Christmas Greetings
Marcus

werner
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Re: Stenography

Post by werner » February 22nd, 2010, 1:39 pm

Antwort_01
Autor: Werner

Hello Marcus,

Yes, I belong to the generation who still had to learn stenography at school. I still write in shorthand when I am in a hurry and to write quick notes. Only that I don't use a stenography pen. I like using my Pelikan 100N with a very flexible nib, or the model 400 with a semi-flexible nib from the 50s. The pressure doesn't have to be that hard, the golden nibs of that time stand a lot. But I must admit that a little care in writing is important. Luckily I'm the only one who has to be able to decipher it, in the end.
Greetings
Werner

werner
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Re: Stenography

Post by werner » February 22nd, 2010, 1:40 pm

Antwort_02
Autor: yoda

Hello,
Another one of the extinct species. I recently have learned stenography at a community college course. I like using it, even though I still have to look up the agglomerations in the dictionary (how do you spell Beate?).
Right now, I'm not really quicker when writing shorthand, but I hope it is only a matter of practice.

To your question: I like using the Geha stenography pen. I fill up the cartridge with a syringe. I would say the pen is from the 70s. "Steno" is written on the barrel and it works really well. As an alternative, I have an older Pelikan steno pen and an old Pelikan 120N with a nib that has a "st" on it, which definitely does not mean "stub" in this case. I got all three pens on the fountain pen fair in Nuremberg.

But I can also tell that with the growing routine, the writing instrument matters less and less as long as the nib is fine enough.

Greetings to all steno-writers (and everyone else, too)

Hugo

werner
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Re: Stenography

Post by werner » February 22nd, 2010, 1:41 pm

Antwort_03
Autor: Werner

Hello Hugo,

I have one of those 120 steno pens, too. I almost forgot it completely. After having read your post I decided to "reactivate" it and to give it a try.

Werner

werner
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Re: Stenography

Post by werner » February 22nd, 2010, 1:42 pm

Antwort_04
Autor: noGromo

Hello there,

I guess you're right, Werner. The old pens should be flexible enough to stand the pressure. In the next lesson I will try out my age-old Waterman with the semi-flexible nib. I can't wait.

I wished I had learned writing in shorthand at school. Now I have to learn it on my own and with a lot of own initiative. But it is a lot of fun, too. Getting started really is the hardest. IT feels like your learning to read and write for the first time. And learning new things becomes harder the older you get. But I think I'll go ahead with it.

Greetings
Marcus

werner
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Re: Stenography

Post by werner » February 22nd, 2010, 1:43 pm

Antwort_05
Autor: G-H-L

Hello,

When I learned shorthand at school, we used pencils for shorthand in class, but for the exam we had to use a fountain pen. I used my steno pen from Geha. But I exchanged the nib for an OM nib.

A couple of years ago I bought myself a Pelikano fountain pen for stenography. However, I use it more for normal writing than for shorthand writing. I have one big problem with writing in shorthand: I can write in shorthand, but I cannot read it anymore afterwards.
I would have to practice that again first.

Writing in standard shorthand is a fast way of writing, but the fastest way is to use the abridged stenography or syllabary.

Greetings
Gerhard

werner
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Re: Stenography

Post by werner » February 22nd, 2010, 1:46 pm

Antwort_06
Autor: noGromo

Hi there,

I recently started using stenography pencils and I must say it works for me!! Sure, it gets on my nerves having to sharpen the pencil so often. I guess it's the only case I know where fountain pens are more practical. (I seem to have a penchant for the unpractical)

Greetings
Marcus

Beryl Pratt
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Re: Stenography

Post by Beryl Pratt » May 4th, 2013, 1:29 pm

Hello Shorthand Writers

I learned Pitman's Shorthand in 1973 using an endless supply of pencils, but after that I quickly found that a fountain pen is far superior for shorthand, producing higher speed and being clearer to read, and so improving the accuracy of the transcript. At that time I bought several Senator Professional shorthand pens (gold nib, piston filled) all of which are still writing perfectly today. I have also tried the Geha Steno, both in the past and the recently discontinued Pelikan version, but I found that the nibs of these were too firm for my liking, but may suit other shorthand systems.

I have provided an extensive resource for Pitman’s Shorthand on my website and blog, and with the growing interest in the subject, it is important that modern flex pens are easily obtainable, rather than chasing a limited supply of vintage pens at vintage prices. As the Senator and Steno are now only available as second-hand, I would recommend to shorthand learners the inexpensive Noodler's Flex pens. They come in three sizes and as all the parts are friction fit, the nibs are fully adjustable for flex and ink flow - to maximum flex for Pitman's and minimum for Gregg, Teeline or other systems that do not rely on thick and thin lines.

You can see both being demonstrated for shorthand in my Youtube videos:
Noodler’s Flex: http://youtu.be/bgqimduDWd8
Vintage Senator Professional: http://youtu.be/Y3OyEzl8ZkM

Best regards

Beryl Pratt, UK

werner
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Re: Stenography

Post by werner » May 5th, 2013, 10:27 am

Hello

there is a interesting discussion at "German Penexchange" about Noodler's Creaper Flex Pen. If you interested please have a look to this Postings. In the first posting you will also find a link to a demo with Noodler's Flex Pen.

Link to postings at "German Penexchange":
http://www.penexchange.de/forum_neu/vie ... f=5&t=7266

Link to youtube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... 55XcMIPm-c

Many thanks to you for your posting, I leave a tip to your posting at German Penexchange.

Best regards
Werner

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